J Marvin Hunter's

FRONTIER TIMES

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Vol 04 No. 04 - January 1927

The Mystery Woman at Fort Concho

Long about 1870 there appeared among the wild dare-devil element of Fort Concho a reckless woman who became known as the "Mystic Maude," although she assumed different names as occasion -might demand. She was a mystery to nearly all, good and bad, who chanced to know her and hence she was called the "Mystery Maude." She came in on the overland stage from San Antonio, secured and furnished a room in an adobe "Over the River" and during her stay exhibited all the traits of a refined, educated woman who had been brought up in the best society and was by birth and training a typical gentlewoman. Yet, as was subsequently shown, she became a member of the gambling fraternity who, night after night, might be found in the rooms over a saloon where she played for high stakes with a success that astonished the veterans of the card table. This is her story.

Further Mentions: Lottie Deno, "Monte Bill", "Smoky Joe", Johnny Golden, Bill Gibson, Jim Draper, George Matthews, San Antonio, Fort Griffin


A Letter from President Sam Houston

Letter concerning the president’s great desire for treaty at the Waco Village acceptable to the Indians in hopes of a cessation of hostilities

Further Mentions: J. W. Jackson, Sam Houston, Benjamin Bryant, General Flaco, Major Hays, Susan Blankenship, Sam Houston Blankenship, Jeff T. Kemp, Bartlett, Milam County, Rio Grande


The Print of the Crooked Hoof

By Donald F. McCarthy, Montrose, CA

In spite of the reckless and ruthless character of most frontier outlaws, there were some outlaws of pioneer days who seemed to have a streak of genuine chivalry in their make-up--men who never complicated robbery with bloodshed and who, in their choice of a victim, exhibited a judicious fastidiousness which even won for then a certain degree of popularity, a sentiment entertained by all classes of the community except the express companies. Such a man seems to have been Bill Brazelton, the subject of this story.

Bill's reputation for boldness and bravery won him the admiration and the friendship of many, a fact which contributed not a little to the length and success of his career as a road agent. Six feet and more in height, sinewy and spare of build, he was always, in the saddle or off, a striking and handsome figure.

Further Mentions: Charcters: G. P. R. James, Jack Sheppard, Dick Turpen, Claude Duval, Plummer, Ames, Murieta, Vasquez, Joaquin, Bill Brazelton, Miller

Locations: Maricopa Wells, San Pedro Valley, Cactus Forest, Picacho Desert, Santa Cruz


Overland Trip In 1880

By Morve L. Weaver, Visalia, CA

IN 1880 Robert Johnston concluded to leave Texas and go, overland, to California. He outfitted with saddle and pack horses and just at the start made the acquaintance of a young man bound in the same direction. Johnston offered the stranger transportation of his scanty outfit on the pack horse in return for his company on the trail, and the offer was gladly accepted, and the start made. The two emigrants took the regular stage route from San Antonio to El Paso and shortly fell in with a wagon-train, thought to be from Bee County, Texas, who was also trailing west.

The train was of about twenty wagons well outfitted and properly armed, but on a sort of go-as-you-please basis. Johnston and his companion traveled with them for several days, making separate camps at night and in no way becoming identified with the outfit.

As a dry march of nearly one hundred miles lay before the train on account of the drying of Van Horn Wells, Johnston's companion suggested to the wagon-master that the two would join the train and assist in its defense against Indian attack which was threatened between Van Horn Wells and Eagle Springs Station, if the wagon-master would-furnish them with water during the dry march. This offer, made without the knowledge of Johnston, was refused.

At the end of the first day's dry march which took the train about to Van Horn Wells, Johnston and his companion pushed on alone for a night ride, unconsciously passing the crossing of the stage road and an Indian trail, where trouble was apprehended, in the night and arrived safely at Eagle Springs during the second day. Owing to the length of the dry march, the two had proceeded slowly and were only fairly established at Eagle Springs when one of the wagons of the train, driven by "Dutch Willie," tore into the Station with the news that Indians had...

Further Mentions: Characters: Robert Johnston, "Dutch Willie", Murphy, Captain Crawford, Victorio.

Locations: San Antonio, El Paso, Bee County, Van Horn Wells, Eagle Springs Station, Whitman Canyon, Fort Cummings, Cook’s Canyon.


The Ill-Fated Beales Colony

John Henry Brown

Lengthy and detailed account of the attempt to form a colony of Europeans and Americans on the Rio Grande, about thirty miles above the present town of Eagle Pass, begun, in New York in November, 1833, and terminating in bitter failure and the slaughter of a portion of the colonists on the 2nd of April, 1836.

Further Mentions: Characters: Dr. John Charles Beales, Richard Exter, Maria Dolores Soto, Stephen Julian Wilson, Jose Manuel Roquella, Col. Reuben Ross, A. LeGrand, Capt. R. B. Marcy, Kimble, Bois, Baseboth, Boring, Ryon, McCrummins, Weathers, Jones, Thompson, John L. Woodbury, Egerton, Isaac A. Johnson, Samuel Sawyer, William Jessop Ward, Jose Maria Cosio, Miguel Aldrete, John Quinn, Smith, Little, Power, Mrs. Harris, Mrs. Horn, Dr. James Grant, Col. Reuben R. Brown, Samuel W. McKneely, Frank W. Johnson, Daniel J. Toler, John H. Love, James M. Miller, Henry Smith, Sam Houston, Holland Coffee, Benjamin Hill, William Donoho, James B. Donoho, David Workman, Mrs. Plummer, Mrs. Lucy Dodson, William Dodson, Lucy Estes,

Locations: Rio Grande, Eagle Pass, Santa Fe, Colorado River, Red River, Canadian River, Washita River, Sherman County, Midland, Nueces River, San Antonio, Laredo, Copano, Goliad, Dolores, Las Moras Creek, Del Rio, San Patricio, Texarkana, Guadalupe River, Brazos River, Big Wichita, Denison, Georgetown, Clarksville, New Franklin, Parker’s Fort


Comrade’s Appeal Awakens Memories

From Kerrville Mountain Sun

Account of the frontier days of Ranger Company F around Kerrville

Mentions Characters: Thomas J. Frayne, G. F. Steinbeck, Neal Coldwell, W. H. Witt, R. Jones, J. H. Rhodes, Charles Elston, R. B. Moore, J. Beakley, S. C. Bowman, W. Clifton, W. G. Coston, J. B. Dollahite, M. Fanning, E. Faulkner, James Gibbens, A. B. Glisson, S. Guajardo, G. Johnson, T. Lane, W. Layton, G. T. McCann, A. Merrit, M. F. Moore, Frank Moore, Frank Morgan, J. H. North, J. C. Nowlin, T. Patton, George Patton, B. F. Peterson, G. W. Saunders, H. F. Wellborn

Locations: Kerrville, Center Point, San Antonio, Austin, Bexar County, Pedernales River


JAMES ALFRED CHEATHAM

Account of James Alfred Cheatham, who was born in Kentucky, August 18, 1842. He came to Texas when a young man and settled in Brown county, when Indians and buffalo were in common. He gained recognition as a man who did much in quelling the Indian uprisings in the area – this is his story.

Further Mentions: 12 children, 8 sons. and 4 daughters; Joe Cheatham, of Amarillo; Hop Cheatham of Brownwood ; Jim Cheatham, Dan Cheatham, of Sherman ; Roland Cheatham, of Abilene ; Will Cheatham, of Panhandle ; Sam Cheatham, Ivan Cheatham, of Abilene; Mrs. Hattie Bonsick, Mrs. Emily Mauldin, Mrs. Zola Gwathney of Brookesmith, and Miss Flora Cheatham of Abilene. Also one brother, Dick Cheatham of Whon, and one sister, Mrs. H. Hunter, of Cisco.


"Texas’ Oldest Twins"

Account of Mrs. Amanda. Veale, and a twin brother, W. R. Ables, who were born in Rusk County. The two watched the state evolve during its wilderness period. This is their story.

Mentions Characters: Amanda Veale, W. R. Ables, Harrison Ables, H. C. Casey

Locations: Rusk County, Dublin, Hill County, Jacks Branch, Hillsboro, Houston


Restoration of Warren Lyons

By Capt. D. W. Roberts, Austin, Texas

Account of Mr. Lyons and family who settled on the Navidad, Lavaca County at a time when the entire State of Texas was a frontier and it took men and women of wonderful courage to brave the dangers and endure the hardships and privations to which they were subjected. Of such were the Lyons family, which consisted of Mr. and Mrs. Lyons and three sons. The two older boys were away from home when their father was murdered by the Indians and the youngest boy, Warren, eleven years of age, was with his father at the cowpen when the Indians attacked them, killing the father and taking the boy prisoner. Mrs. Lyons was at the house and was not molested. Eleven years later, James B. Roberts, while locating the German Land Colony at Fredericksburg, visited the Comanche camp six miles west of where Mason is now, on Honey Creek and saw a white 'man there. He spoke to him and asked him if his name was Lyons. He replied in the affirmative, but said, "Don't talk to me here," but told him where to sleep and he would come to him in the night...

Further Mentions: Characters: Warren Lyons, James B. Roberts, Lucy Boatwright, John S. Ford

Locations: Navidad, Lavaca County, Fredericksburg, Mason, Honey Creek, San Antonio


First Panhandle Stockmen’s Association

By O. H. Nelson, Romero, Texas

During the fall and winter of 1878-79, Colonel Goodnight and a few other leading cowmen began suggesting the advisability of organizing in self protection, and in the spring of 1880 they called a meeting of the stockmen of the Panhandle in Mobeetie, then the capital 'of the Panhandle, and organized the Panhandle Stockmen's Association for the purpose of mutual benefit, co-operation and protection, especially for the small ranchmen. This is the story.

Further Mentions: Characters: Tom S. Bugbee with Quarter Circle T. brand; R. L. (Dick) McNulty with the Turkey Track; W. E. Anderson with the Scissors brand; H. W.' (Hank) Cresswell with the Bar C C; Robert Moody with the P. 0; Tom Connell and D. Eubanks with the D; Joe Morgan, Mose Hays, Huff and Mell Wright, Bee Hopkins, Frank Biggers, George Anderson, F. B. York, Judge Paulley, Tuttle & Chapman, a Mr. Burdick, J. V. Andrews, Alex Young, William Kelly, Dick Bumgreaser, Brennan & Hill, Mr. Ewing, (father of Judge Reece Ewing, now of Miami), Al Clay, Henry and Dick Barton, J. M. (Doe) Day, Tom Word * Charles Goodnight, T. S. Bugbee, Hank W. Cresswell, , Robert Moody, J. F. Evans, R. L. McNulty, W. E. Anderson, Tom Connell, D. Eubanks, Joe Morgan, Mose Hays, Huff And Mell Wright, Bee Hopkins, Frank Biggers, George Anderson, F. B. York, Judge Paulley, J. V. Andrews, Alex Young, William Kelly, Dick Bumgreaser, Al Clay, Henry And Dick Barton, J. M. Day, Tom Word, G. W. Arrington, Cape Willingham, Perry LaForce, Harry Groom, D. W. Van Horn, Henry Fleming, Harry McGahey, N. T. Eaton, Tobe Odom, Mark Husselby, Judge Dubbs, Frank Clampit, Frank Goodwin, Mr. Cantrill, John M. Shelton, R. B. Masterson, John Powers, Bill Miller, Henry Fry, R. T. Alexander, John Tod, Gunter Q. Munson, J. F. Evans, Captain McMurray, Bill McDonald, In the Mobeetie-Ft. Elliott country were; G. W. Arrington, Cape Willingham, Perry La Force, Colonel B. B. and Harry Groom, D. W. Van Horn, Henry Fleming, Harry MeGahey, the Standard Cattle company, Mr. Allen, manager with 3 D brand; Smith, Reed & Evans, with S R E brand, Mr. Thurmond, manager.. N. T. (Nick) Eaton, U U brand; Tobe Odom, T T brand; Mark Hussell by, Mr. Schick, Judge Dubbs, Frank Clampit, Frank Goodwin, Mr. Cantrill on White Deer; John M. Shelton, R. B. Masterson, John Powers, owner of the J Buckle brand Mattox Brothers and Day of Y-Cross, both of the latter ill Greer county, then a part of Texas; Bill Miller, Henry Fry, the Rev. Alexander, father of, R. T. Alexander, the now well known breeder of Herefords, of Zyback, Hemphill county; John Tod * Lazy F. brands; Gunter Q. Munson of the T Anchor; J. F. Evans of the Spade; Rowe Brothers of the R O; Morrison Brothers of the Doll Baby; Coleman & Dyer of the Shoe Bar, and Goodnight & Dyer of the Flying T brands. The latter firm was composed of Mrs. M. A. Goodnight and her brother, Walter Dyer who in 1883 sold to Bugbee & Nelson, a firm composed of Thomas S. Bugbee and O. H. Nelson; Finch, Lord & Nelson of the Bar 96 and Bar O H brands ; L. H. Carhart of the Quarter Circle Heart brand; Brown & McClelland of the Bar M, a firm composed of Judge G. A. Brown and T. S. McClelland; Sam Dyer, Leigh Dyer, Rev. W. A. Allen, Matador L. & C. Co., H. H. Campbell, manager; Britain & Lomax of the Spur brand; Frank Houston on the McClelland Creek; Archie Williams, Col. Edwin E. Wilson representing Underwood and Clark of Kansas City, who sold several large ranches to English and Scottish capitalists, and for a few years handled some of them. J. M. Coburn of the Hansford County L. & C. Co., of the Turkey Track brand ; Glidden & Sanborn of the Frying Pan brand; Campbell & Austin of near Tascosa; J. P. Wiser, W. P. Herring and Pat Doyle of the Dominion Cattle company, owners of the Box T ; Charlie Rath, Henry Hamburg, Conkle & Lytle, with Rocking Chair brand; Bill Koogle, Mr. Forrest, and many others, the Clarendon vicinity and on the Red River and south thereof were Adair & Goodnight of the JA, Lazy F. brands; Gunter Q. Munson of the T Anchor; J. F. Evans of the Spade; Rowe Brothers of the R 0; Morrison Brothers of the Doll Baby; Coleman & Dyer of the Shoe Bar, and Goodnight & Dyer of the Flying T brands. The latter firm was composed of Mrs. M. A. Goodnight and her brother, Walter Dyer who in 1883 sold to Bugbee & Nelson, a firm composed of Thomas S. Bugbee and 0. H. Nelson; Finch, Lord & Nelson of the Bar 96 and Bar 0 H brands ; L. H. Carhart of the Quarter Circle Heart brand; Brown & McClelland of the Bar M, a firm composed of Judge G. A. Brown and T. S. McClelland ; Sam Dyer, Leigh Dyer, Rev. W. A. Allen, Matador L. & C. Co., H. H. Campbell, manager; Britain & Lomax of the Spur brand; Frank Houston on the M.cClelland Creek.; Archie Williams, Col. Edwin E. Wilson representing Underwood and Clark of Kansas City, who sold several large ranches to English and Scottish capitalists, and for a few years handled some of them. J. M. Coburn of the Hansford County L. & C. Co., of the Turkey Track brand ; Glidden & Sanborn of the Frying Pan brand; Campbell & Austin of near Tascosa; J. P. Wiser, W. P. Herring and Pat Doyle of the Dominion Cattle company, owners of the Box T ; Charlie Rath, Henry Hamburg, Conkle & Lytle, with Rocking Chair brand; Bill Koogle, Mr. Forrest, and many others

Locations: Canadian River, Mobeetie, Ft. Elliott, Greer County, Zyback, Hemphill County, Clarendon, Dallas, and many, many other Panhandle locations especially


The Chisholm Trail

By Donald F. McCarthy

The origin of the Chisholm Trail, over which were driven the greatest herds of cattle known to history, and the first and most famous ever blazed in this or any other country, was always more or less a mystry and a source of much dispute among early cattlemen. Jesse Chisholm, for whom the trail took its name, was an Indian trader and trapper, and had an extensive ranch, and a trading post, at Council Grove, on the north bank of the North Canadian River, a few miles west of the site of Oklahoma City. Due to the confusion of names, John Chisum, big cattleman of the upper Pecos River, near Roswell, New Mexico, was generally credited by many cowmen with being the originator of that trail, which lay, as a matter of fact, nearly four hundred miles east of. his ranch on the Pecos, a country through which John Chisum never drove cattle, and probably never even saw.

Characters: George W. Saunders, John Chisum, Henry Spekes, Jesse Chisholm, Talahina Rogers, Sam Houston

Locations: Pecos River, Roswell, Bryon County, Council Grove, Fort Worth...


Historic Jackson Cabin

The Jackson cabin stands in the southeastern corner of. Mills county, about two miles off the road that leads to Regency from Mullin. The territory or locality in which the old-time cabin stands used to be in Brown county. When Mills county was created in 1887 out of parts of Brown, and Comanche, the locality in which the cabin is located was taken from Brown county. The cabin was made of elm logs and is 16 feet square. It had a rock chimney finished by Mose Jackson, the man who settled in that wild locality, and who with his family, or most of it was murdered by the Indians. The family consisted of Jackson, his wife, one daughter 18 years of age, and two smaller children ranging in age from 7 to 12 years. Late in the autumn of 1858 Jackson and two neighbors, Albert Jay and Charlie Kirkpatrick, went to look for a tree suitable for making boards, as they needed boards for covering their houses. A large pecan tree was found on the bayou about six miles distant, and as pecans were maturing, the three men agreed to bring their family and make a day of it, getting out boards, and gathering pecans. Accordingly the next morning all three families started for the big tree on the bayou. The Kirkpatrick and the Jay families reached their destination all right and worked all day without molestation; wondering why Jackson and his family did not come, but suspecting no trouble. This is the sad account of the Jackson murders.

Further Mentions: Characters: Mose Jackson, Albert Jay, Charlie Kirkpatrick, Elijah Barcroft, Jim Barcroft, Don Cox, Tom Denton, Williams Clements, Jesse Bonds, John Carnes, Jim Holmsley, Sim Walsh, Frank Collins, Lou Price

Locations: Mills County, Regency, Mullin, Brown County, Williams Ranch, Brownwood, Goldthwaite, Comanche, Camp Colorado, Coryell County, Mercer’s Gap, Meridian, Salt Gap

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